Wunderli Scholarships: Now Open for Application In Your Student Portal

The History Department is delighted to announce a NEW scholarship program for all undergraduate History majors, and graduate students: The Wunderli scholarships. Applications are NOW OPEN to apply for this scholarship, through your student portal. The deadline for the application is March 1. Scholarships will be given in amounts UP TO $5000 for the next school year. Please see the information below, or go here to the UCCS scholarship page for more information.

Wunderli Scholarship

Description

The Wunderli Scholarships, named after the Department’s esteemed Professor Emeritus of Medieval History, provides support for undergraduate History majors and graduate students in our M.A. program. It is funded by a generous bequest from Judith Price (1944-2012), a long-time Instructor in Asian History in the Department. We seek especially to assist students whose financial burdens may interfere with the pursuit of a degree in history, as well as students with a record of extraordinary accomplishment. Awards may vary from $1,000 to $5,000 for the academic year. Student must demonstrate financial need by competing the FAFSA no later than March 1.

Application Requirements

The following requirements must be submitted via the UCCS Scholarship Application in the portal.

  • Special Essay

Special Essay Topic

Address each topic below in less than 1,000 words total:

  • Describe where you are at in your History program, what courses you have taken in the History Department, and when you plan to graduate.
  • Describe your current total financial picture in terms of paying for your college education/graduate degree. Please list all sources of support û from parents, family, significant other, other scholarships and fellowships you may be receiving, student grants and loans, and any other financial means of support that you currently rely on to pay for your education. Preference for this scholarship is for students with limited sources of external support.
  • Describe your career to date at UCCS; why you are a History major or pursuing a graduate degree in History?
  • How would being a recipient of this scholarship assist you in achieving your goals in our program?
  • How would being a scholarship recipient alleviate you from other financial burdens û student loans, long work hours, etc. û that might hinder you from achieving your goals as a History student?
  • If you are a graduate student, please indicate what you hope to accomplish with your M.A. degree.

Award Status

Applicants will be notified of scholarship results in the beginning of May.

Application Procedures

If you think you are eligible for this scholarship and would like to apply, log in to the UCCS Scholarship Application.

Deadline

03/01/2015

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Habits of Mind

Paul Harvey

I have just completed another Senior Thesis course with a group of 16 very game and able students who produced some wonderful works of history based on original research. Sometimes other department heads and people at other institutions have asked me, “why do you make all your majors do a SEnior Thesis? Shouldn’t that be for the Honors students”?

The answer, I think, is beautifully explained in this piece by renowned historians James Grossman and Anthony Grafton, entitled “Habits of Mind: Why College Students Who Do Serious Historical Research Become Independent, Analytical Thinkers.”  Here is a brief excerpt, which I hope will entice you to read all of it. And this is a good place to send anyone to who questions the values of work that we do in the Humanities, and specifically in History:

Why do we teach these students—fresh, bright young undergraduates—to do research? Why take people who are forming themselves, who should be thinking about life, death, and the universe, and send them off to an archive full of dusty documents and ask them to tell us something new about the impact of the Civil War in a country town in Pennsylvania or Virginia, or the formation of Anglo-Norman kingship, or the situation of slaves in the Old South?

The answer is so simple that we sometimes forget to give it, but it matters. We teach students to do research because it’s one powerful way to teach them to understand and appreciate the past on its own terms, while at the same time finding meaning in the past that is rooted in the student’s own intellect and perspective. Classrooms and assigned readings are necessary to provide context: everyone needs to have an outline in mind, if only to have something to take apart; and everyone needs to know how to create those outlines and query them constructively. Reading monographs and articles is vital, too. To get past the big, generalized stories, you have to see how professional scholars have formed arguments, debated one another, and refined theories in light of the evidence.

But the most direct and powerful way to grasp the value of historical thinking is through engagement with the archive—or its equivalent in an era when oral history and documentary photography can create new sources, and digital databases can make them available to anyone with a computer. The nature of archives varies as widely as the world itself. They can be collections of documents or data sets, maps or charts, books with marginal notes scrawled in them that let you look over the shoulders of dead readers, or a diary that lets you look over the shoulder of a dead midwife. What matters is that the student develops a question and then identifies the particular archive, the set of sources, where it can be answered.

Why do this? Partly because it’s the only way for a student to get past being a passive consumer and critic and to become a creator, someone who reads other historians in the light of having tried to do what they do. Partly because it’s the way that historians help students master skills that are not specific to history. When students do research, they learn to think through problems, weigh evidence, construct arguments, and then criticize those arguments and strip them down and make them better—and finally to write them up in cogent, forceful prose, using the evidence deftly and economically to make their arguments and push them home.

The best defense for research, however, is that it’s in the archive where one forms a scholarly self—a self that, when all goes well, is intolerant of weak arguments and loose citation and all other forms of shoddy craftsmanship; a self that doesn’t accept a thesis without asking what assumptions and evidence it rests on; a self that doesn’t have a lot of patience with simpleminded formulas and knows an observation from an opinion and an opinion from an argument.

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Cemetery Crawl in Fountain Saturday October 18th!

A Quick Reminder:
This year’s UCCS Cemetery Crawl is Saturday, October 18th.

A group of UCCS history students will join with faculty in October to recreate local history and raise funds to protect a local cemetery.

For the third year, students in Barbara Headle’s “The Last Great Necessity: Cemeteries, Memory and American History”course will team with former students and returning volunteers to lead tours of the Fountain Fairview Cemetery, 757 South Santa Fe Ave. After extensive research, students will don period dress and relate the stories of the people buried at the cemetery who settled and developed the Fountain Valley during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This year’s emphasis is on the children who lived in Fountain. UCCS students and volunteers will interpret the children’s life stories.

The tours are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 18. The final tour begins at 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for students with identification and free for those less than 12 years old. Proceeds from the tour and a concurrent silent auction at the Fountain Public Library will fund the repair of damaged headstones in the cemetery and future installation of a video surveillance system.

This year’s cemetery crawl is dedicated to the memory of Alicia Gutscher, a UCCS graduate with an Anthropology degree. Not long after last year’s event, for which she was a student volunteer, Alicia was diagnosed with inoperable cancer. She passed away on February 17, 2014. She was 25 years old.

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October Cemetery Tours — Article from UCCS Communique

History students, faculty to lead October cemetery tours

Posted by

A group of UCCS history students will join with faculty in October to recreate local history and raise funds to protect a local cemetery.

For the third year, students in Barbara Headle’s “The Last Great Necessity: Cemeteries, Memory and American History”course will team with former students and returning volunteers to lead tours of the Fountain Fairview Cemetery, 757 South Santa Fe Ave. After extensive research, students will don period dress and relate the stories of the people buried at the cemetery who settled and developed the Fountain Valley during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This year’s emphasis is on the children who lived in Fountain. UCCS students and volunteers will interpret the children’s life stories.

The tours are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 18. The final tour begins at 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for students with identification and free for those less than 12 years old. Proceeds from the tour and a concurrent silent auction at the Fountain Public Library will fund the repair of damaged headstones in the cemetery and future installation of a video surveillance system.

“Children have always been full participants in the unfolding of human history,” Headle said recently. “However, sometimes the vacant chair or the empty child’s bed is all that remains after a child is gone. Their experiences are important. When we exclude them from the historical narrative, we leave a void in our history that is, at best, difficult to recover.”

For example, the students will research and tell the story of a 14-year-old girl buried at Fairview. While her life was short, her story tells the travails of a community ravished by Spanish Influenza, a pandemic of 1918-19. Her father also perished as a result of the illness. That child’s headstone, a 150-pound marble block shaped in the form of a tree stump with an inscription “a life cut short” was recently toppled by vandals.

“Some of the children may have passed away too early to have had a voice from themselves,” Kim Sweetwood, a history graduate student, said. “Students will portray their relatives, or their friends, talking about these children and the general context of history in Fountain when they were living and when they passed away.”

In addition to her history studies, Sweetwood is also a sign language interpreter at many UCCS events and works as a student assistant in the Department of History.

This week, Sweetwood presented invitations to the Oct. 18 cemetery tour to members of the Fountain City Council. The council recently authorized additional funding for a video surveillance system, an issue that Headle and her students brought forward when they began the project three years ago. In the past three years, the faculty and student-led project has raised about $5,500.

For Headle, the cemetery tours bring together the research and presentation skills necessary for academic and career success. Cemeteries offer a unique peek into a community’s past, she says, becoming mirrors of the living community by reflecting group cultural values. Making community history more realistic by focusing on an individual, and for the benefit of a near-to-campus community, are added benefits.

For more information about the event, contact Sweetwood, 433-4597, orksignsasl@gmail.com or visit https://www.facebook.com/FFFCemetery

Related stories:

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Friends of Fountain Fairview Cemetery 2014 Programs

We’re pleased to announce this fall’s program of events to benefit the Fountain Fairview Cemetery, a project led by our instructor Mrs. Barbara Headle and her students over the last three years.

Here’s a full flyer, with images, for all the events, just click here: Friends of Fountain. You may also check the group’s Facebook page at any time.

Below is a schedule of the fall events. We hope to see you there!

History of American Cemeteries: October 2nd, Thursday 7 – 8:30 pm
Fountain Library, Guest Speaker Mrs. Barbara Headle, UCCS. Free.

 Historic Lantern Tour
Wrong Place at the Wrong Time, or What is Murder?
October 4th, Saturday 6-7:30 pm at Fountain Fairview Cemetery.
Tickets $20 each sold at the event. Not appropriate for children under 12.

 Historic Cemetery Tour, as portrayed by UCCS students and volunteers.
The History of Fountain, as told through her Children.
October 18th, Saturday 10-3 pm
Fountain Fairview Cemetery. Tickets $10 each, sold at the event.
Teens $7, children 12 and under free with guardian. 

Reception and Silent Auction to benefit Fairview Cemetery.
Bid for a Hot Air Balloon Ride, Gift Baskets, Photography and Gift Cards.
October 18th, Saturday Noon-4 pm
Fountain Library. Hosted by the Fountain Historical Society and Museum. Free.

For updates see us on Facebook 

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Welcome to the 2014 School Year

15 August 2014

Dear UCCS History Majors and M.A. Students,

Welcome to the 2014-15 UCCS school year! This is Paul Harvey, Chair of the History Department, I wanted to introduce myself to all of you, to encourage you to stop by and introduce yourself, and to let you know of some of the exciting events and opportunities in the department and at UCCS for this upcoming year. My office is Columbine Hall 2055, email pharvey@uccs.edu, and phone 255-4078.

Besides me, our departmental assistant, Ian Smith, is there in COB 2048 during the day to help you with all your needs; he can also be reached at email at ismith2@uccs.edu, or at 255-4069. I want to encourage all of you to make use of our best resources for departmental information and updates: the departmental website at http://www.uccs.edu/history, and the departmental blog at http://uccshistory.wordpress.com.

You will find at the website (http://www.uccs.edu/history) an abundance of information, including full information on all the regular faculty and instructors; helpful guides to the major itself; a special section just for those of you who are transfer students; information about the senior thesis required of all history majors; information on the undergraduate (BA) and graduate (MA) programs; events, lectures, and opportunities during the school year; and much, much more.

You will find at the departmental blog, at http://uccshistory.wordpress.com, reminders, announcements, and “late breaking news,” as well as occasional guest posts from students and faculty members on historical issues in the news. For example, we will periodically post the schedule for senior thesis for several semesters in advance, helping you plan when you want to do your thesis. I will post updates on events and opportunities locally such as lectures, work opportunities, and internships.

This year, I also wanted to let you know about several new developments within the department itself. First, I am delighted to announce that Ms. Roy Jo Sartin is now a half-time Instructor in the Department, meaning she will be teaching two courses a semester in fields such as Ancient Greee, Ancient Egypt, and Mesopotamian History. Also, we are beginning a new program of History Internships for both undergraduates and graduates; it will be led by Leah Davis-Witherow, chief Archivist at the Pioneers Museum – look for History 3955 to sign up and get some great experience working for local public history institutions.

Once again, welcome to the school year, and best of luck.

All my best,

Paul Harvey
Professor and Chair of History, UCCS

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History Department Student Award Winners

UCCS HISTORY DEPARTMENT AWARDS CEREMONY, APRIL 25, 2014
Ceremony from 2 – 3 p.m., April 25, 2014, UC 116

OUTSTANDING UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT(s):
Danielle McKinley
Colette Richards

OUTSTANDING GRADUATE STUDENT:
Angela Knipe

UCCS GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP WINNERS
Megan Dobbins Ishum
Sabine Banuelos

CU FACULTY ASSOCIATION KISSLINGER AWARD
Amy Haines

OUTSTANDING SENIOR THESES BY SECTION

Professor Sackett’s Section

***Jennifer Hepworth: ‘Holocaust Writing: An Individual’s Account’
***Amber Bradish: ‘The Women Behind the Men: Sophie Scholl and Freya von Moltke and the German Resistance’
***Taylor Wirth: ‘Transitions from Communism in Eastern Europe’

Professor Duvick’s Section
***Jennifer Vanderwalker, “The Search for the Inconceivable Uncontained: Revealing the Unique Eschatology in the Gospel of Truth”

Professor Headle’s Section
***Alexander Keck, “Blood and Thunder: The Evolution of the American Navy from 1776 to 1815.”

Professor Myers’ Section

Erin Wallace, “Poetry with a Purpose:  The Bardic Defense of Gaelic Culture During the Tudor Conquest.”

Megan Bell, “Christine de Pizan and her Mighty Pen”

CSURF PRESENTERS
Anna Rosza, John Garrett, Maria Cordova, and Jennifer Hepworth

GRADUATE TRAVEL FELLOWSHIP RECIPIENTS
**Colin McAllister  **Sabine Banuelos  **Richard Hernandez

GRADUATING M.A. STUDENTS
**Angela Knipe
**Jeremiah Snyder
**Preston Petermeier
**Maggie Sargeant
**Veronica Spicer
**Christopher Darrow
**Linda Aldrich
**Robin Lynch
**Nicole DeV Emmons

FOUNTAIN/FAIRVIEW CEMETERY PROJECT VOLUNTEERS
Barbara Headle will recognize students who participated in the Fountain/Fairview Cemetery Project

SPECIAL RECOGNITION AWARD FROM THE HISTORICAL ENGINEERING SOCIETY
**Ben Putnam, President of the Society

SPECIAL PUBLISHING RECOGNITION
Kym Brumlik, for article published in the Journal of South Asian Studies
Samantha Christiansen (alumnus), for new book conract

SPECIAL THANK-YOU RECOGNITIONS FOR SERVICE TO THE DEPARTMENT
***Kim Sweetwood
***Aimee Morgado

INTERNSHIPS IN HISTORY
**Preston Petermeier, African American Historical and Genealogical Society and the Broadmoor Archives
**Angie Knipe and Dylan Tyler Interns at the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum

COMMUNITY SERVICE AT LOCAL HISTORY DAYS
**Linda Aldrich    **Jeremiah Snyder    **Lindsey Duncan

TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIPS FOR COMING ACADEMIC YEAR
Sabine Banuelos, Ray Shaner, Lindsey Duncan, Rochelle Richards-Burks, Megan Ishum, Jennifer Broderick

TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIPS JUST COMPLETED
Linda Aldrich, Aimee Morgado, Linda Aldrich, DeV Emmons, Angie Knipe, Robin Lynch

OUTSTANDING INSTRUCTOR AWARD, LAS
******   Leah Davis-Witherow  *****

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